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CORRESPONDENCE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 26  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 226

Comment on sonographic evaluation of abdominal organs in sickle cell disease


1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Department of Biological Science, Joseph Ayobabalola University, Ilara-Mokin, Nigeria

Date of Web Publication14-Dec-2018

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Beuy Joob
Medical Academic Center, Bangkok
Thailand
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JMU.JMU_59_18

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How to cite this article:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Comment on sonographic evaluation of abdominal organs in sickle cell disease. J Med Ultrasound 2018;26:226

How to cite this URL:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Comment on sonographic evaluation of abdominal organs in sickle cell disease. J Med Ultrasound [serial online] 2018 [cited 2021 Jan 18];26:226. Available from: http://www.jmuonline.org/text.asp?2018/26/4/226/247291

Dear Editor,

We read the publication on “sonographic evaluation of some abdominal organs in sickle cell disease (SCD) patients in a tertiary health institution in Northeastern Nigeria” with a great interest.[1] Luntsi et al. reported that “abdominal sonography in SCD patients revealed varied remarkable changes in the size, echotexture, intraluminal deposits, and wall thickness in the liver, gallbladder, kidneys, and spleen.”[1] We would like to share the ideas on this report. First, without screening for other common diseases such as hepatitis or metabolic disease, the finding might be the result from other confounding disorders. Second, the clinical importance of the finding and further management should be discussed. We would like to draw attention to the situation from Indochina where a similar problem of high prevalence of hemoglobin disorders, thalassemia, and hemoglobin E disorder is extremely high prevalent. The hepatosplenomegaly, which is the result of extramedullary erythropoiesis, is the common finding.[2] Nevertheless, the abdomen ultrasonography is found to be inferior to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). For monitoring of iron overload in transfusion-dependent cases, the MRI is routinely used.[3],[4]

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  References Top

1.
Luntsi G, Eze CU, Ahmadu MS, Bukar AA, Ochie K. Sonographic evaluation of some abdominal organs in sickle cell disease patients in a tertiary health institution in Northeastern Nigeria. J Med Ultrasound 2018;26:31-6.  Back to cited text no. 1
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2.
Roberts AS, Shetty AS, Mellnick VM, Pickhardt PJ, Bhalla S, Menias CO, et al. Extramedullary haematopoiesis: Radiological imaging features. Clin Radiol 2016;71:807-14.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Krittayaphong R, Viprakasit V, Saiviroonporn P, Siritanaratkul N, Siripornpitak S, Meekaewkunchorn A, et al. Prevalence and predictors of cardiac and liver iron overload in patients with thalassemia: A multicenter study based on real-world data. Blood Cells Mol Dis 2017;66:24-30.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Chuansumrit A, Laothamathat J, Sirachainan N, Sungkarat W, Wongwerawattanakoon P, Kumkrua P, et al. Correlation between liver iron concentration determined by magnetic resonance imaging and serum ferritin in adolescents with thalassaemia disease. Paediatr Int Child Health 2016;36:203-8.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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